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Facebook changes effective January 1, 2015

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Over the past year, we’ve introduced new features and controls to help you get more out of Facebook, and listened to people who have asked us to better explain how we get and use information.

Now, with Privacy Basics, you’ll get tips and a how-to guide for taking charge of your experience on Facebook. We’re also updating our terms, data policy and cookies policy to reflect new features we’ve been working on and to make them easy to understand. And we’re continuing to improve ads based on the apps and sites you use off Facebook and expanding your control over the ads you see.

We hope these updates improve your experience. Protecting people’s information and providing meaningful privacy controls are at the core of everything we do, and we believe today’s announcement is an important step.

Sincerely,
Erin Egan
Global Chief Privacy Officer

Updating Our Terms and Policies: Helping You Understand How Facebook Works and How to Control Your Information

Privacy Basics

Privacy Basics offers interactive guides to answer the most commonly asked questions about how you can control your information on Facebook. For example, you can learn about untagging, unfriending, blocking, and how to choose an audience for each of your posts. This information is available in 36 languages.

Along with our privacy checkup, reminder for people posting publicly and simplified audience selectors, Privacy Basics is the latest step we’ve taken to help you make sure you’re sharing with the people you want.

Helping you get more out of Facebook

Every day, people use our apps and services to connect with the people, places and things they care about. The updates to our policies reflect the new products we’ve been working on to improve your Facebook experience. They also explain how our services work in a way that’s easier to understand. Here are some highlights:

Discover what’s going on around you:

We’re updating our policies to explain how we get location information depending on the features you decide to use. Millions of people check into their favorite places and use optional features like Nearby Friends (currently only available in some regions). We’re working on ways to show you the most relevant information based on where you are and what your friends are up to. For example, in the future, if you decide to share where you are, you might see menus from restaurants nearby or updates from friends in the area.
Make purchases more convenient: In some regions, we’re testing a Buy button that helps people discover and purchase products without leaving Facebook. We’re also working on new ways to make transactions even more convenient.

Find information about privacy on Facebook at the moment you need it: To make them more accessible, we moved tips and suggestions to Privacy Basics. Our data policy is shorter and clearer, making it easier to read.

Understand how we use the information we receive: For example, we use device information to optimize your mobile experience, like understanding battery and signal strength to help us make sure our apps work well for you. We ask for permission to use your phone’s location when we offer optional features like check-ins or adding your location to posts.

Get to know how the family of Facebook companies and apps work together: Over the past few years, Facebook has grown and we want to make sure you know about our family of companies, apps and services. We use the information we collect to improve your experience. For example, if you’re locked out of your Instagram account, you can use your Facebook information to recover your password. Nothing in our updates changes the commitments that Instagram, WhatsApp and other companies have made to protect your information and your privacy.

Your information and advertising: People sometimes ask how their information is shared with advertisers. Nothing is changing with these updates—we help advertisers reach people with relevant ads without telling them who you are. Learn more about ads and how you can control the ads you see.

Keep in mind that your settings on Facebook are not changing, and that some features are only available in certain regions. For example, tag suggestions are only available outside of Canada and the EU.

Giving you more control over ads
We’ve heard from some of you that it can be difficult to control the types of ads you see if you use multiple devices and browsers. In the past, if you opted out of certain kinds of advertising on your laptop, that choice may not have been applied for ads on your phone. We know that many people use more than one phone, tablet or browser to access Facebook, so it should be easy for you to make a single choice that applies across all of your devices.

That’s why Facebook respects the choices you make about the ads you see, across every device. You can opt out of seeing ads on Facebook based on the apps and sites you use through the Digital Advertising Alliance. You can also opt out using controls on iOS and Android. When you tell us you don’t want to see these types of ads, your decision automatically applies to every device you use to access Facebook. Also, we’re now making ad preferences available in additional countries, beginning with Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Ireland and the UK.

These updates take effect on January 1, 2015. As always, we welcome your feedback about our policies.

PINTEREST: This is getting way out of hand!

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 But only in a good way of course!

If you’re using Pinterest, you’ll know what I mean.

I just spent 40 minutes going back and forth on Facebook with other Pinterest aficionados about how awesome it is.  And this isn’t the first time I’ve been drawn into a great convo about this site.

There is one topic that has been coming up repeatedly of late and that is the issue of posting someone else’s images on your Pinterest boards. (Here’s a good example of some of the discussion out there around this topic:  http://directmatchmedia.com/pinterest-copyright.php)

If you are copying another’s content to your computer and then uploading it to Pinterest, you will be running up against copyright issues. Copying and uploading someone else’s content is called stealing plagiarizing because 1we don’t own it and 2. we’re not crediting the author/artist for their work.

So how is everyone on Pinterest getting around this? By making it perfectly clear that the content they have pinned belongs to someone else (by crediting, citing and referencing the author).

What people don’t seem to know is that Pinterest offers a bookmarklet

that when used, allows the viewer to click on the image you’ve posted and it takes them outside of Pinterest to the owner’s own website. This way, the person viewing your Pin will know where you got the image from.

For more information about this, go to the “goodies” (as Pinterest calls them):  http://pinterest.com/about/goodies/ and start using the Bookmarklet for your browser. I think you’ll be glad you did. This type of sharing is going to be challenged over and over in the courts, and you don’t want to be the one left holding the bag.

But just using the Pinterest Bookmarklet will probably not keep you fully out of hot water, so think before you post. And make sure you always credit the author.

Calling all Visionistas!

 As small business owners, all the recent raving about Pinterest and the fabulous statistics ought to grab your attention!

  • more than 10 million users!
  • more than 80% women!
  • and more than 2 million Facebook users daily!

Those are some impressive numbers if you’re looking to find a market for your goods.

Don’t get left behind. Get in on this FREE ecourse to learn everything you need to know about PINTEREST.

Claim Your Free Ecourse Now

 

 

 

How to Set up Facebook’s New Messaging/Email System

Recently Facebook introduced a new messaging system

that allows you to communicate through email, text message, chat or Facebook Messages all in one place. This guide will show you how the messaging system works and how simple it is to set up.

When you’re invited to try the new system, you’ll see a message in Facebook asking you if you want to upgrade to the new system. When you click it, you’ll see an overview like this.

1.  Click “Upgrade Now” to get started.

Next you’ll be invited to claim your @facebook.com email address. Your email address matches your username. So if your name is janesmith, your email address will be janesmith@facebook.com.

2.  Click “Activate Email” to get your address.

Once you’ve done that, you’ll see a message that explains how the email works:

As you can see, emails to that address now go to your Messages folder and if it’s message from people who aren’t your friends, they will go to your “Other Messages” folder. You can also manage who can send you messages in your privacy settings.

3.  Click “Next” when you’re ready and it will ask you if you want to set up text messaging.

This will allow your friends to send you messages via text.

4.  Choose your country and mobile carrier.

5.  Then click “Next”.

The instructions on the page will get you to

6.  text an “F” to a certain number and that will send you an activation code.

7.  When the activation code arrives on your phone, enter it in the space provided.

8.  Click “Activate Text Messaging” when you’re done.

Then you’ll see this message:

You’ll also get a message on your phone that shows you how you can update your Facebook status via text. You can also reply directly to any text messages that come to you from your Facebook friends.

Now you’re all set to use all 4 messaging options for Facebook:

  • Email
  • Text
  • Facebook Messaging
  • Chat

All your conversations will be stored in one place and you can view the full thread of your conversation, even if some messages we sent via different mediums. Here’s an example of a back and forth conversation between Facebook messaging and email. Every time you communicate with this person, you’ll see the conversation in one thread.

Important: If you receive email from someone who is not on your friend’s list or your Facebook friends uses an email address that is not in their Facebook account, the message will go to your “Other Messages”.

To find your “Other Messages” click on “Other” under “Messages” in the left menu:

You can ensure messages from this person go to your main box next time, by moving the message to your “Messages Box”. Just open the message, click “Actions” and choose “Move to Messages”.

Open ID and API’s. What Are They And How Do They Work?

This is a guest post by Trevor Tye of  http://www.optionkey.ca/

APIs and OpenID: What are they?

In today’s wonderful computing world you have a number of really popular companies (such as Twitter, Google and Facebook to name a few), and they have a huge user base. To allow these users access to your web services you can use something called an API or Application Programming interface.

An API allows a programmer to integrate a product or service into their particular product or service (such as a WordPress blog). An example would be having a Gmail account and creating or accessing your WordPress account. This is made possible by their APIs (which is why you see buttons like “Connect with Facebook” or “login with your Gmail Account”).

OpenID

Plugins such as the WordPress Open ID plugin allows users to login to their local WordPress account using an OpenID. This also allows the enabling of commenters to leave authenticated comments using OpenID. The plugin also includes an OpenID provider, enabling users to login to OpenID-enabled sites using their own personal WordPress account. XRDS-Simple is required for the OpenID Provider and some features of the OpenID Consumer.

Since the focus of most OpenID providers (such as Google, Yahoo and AOL) is in identity management, they can be more thorough about protecting your online identity. Most website operators are less likely to be as dedicated to protecting your identity as the OpenID providers, whose focus is on securely hosting user identities.

A good API that most people should have integrated into their website is Open ID.  OpenID is a safe, faster, and easier way to log in to web sites.  Check here to set up an account: http://openid.net/. You will then be able to use an account you already have (so long as that account uses OpenID) to login and join your site or web community without having to fill out an additional sign up form.

OpenID is very useful when setting up a website with a CMS like WordPress as well.  The web developer that sets up such a site can then allow you to use an open ID login to access the site.

What are some benefits of using OpenID?

Most websites ask for an extended, repetitive amount of information in order to use their application. OpenID allows you to sign in to websites with a single click. Basic profile information (such as your name, birth date etc) can be used to pre-populate registration forms, so you spend more time engaging and less time filling out annoying registration pages.

Allowing the user to use Open ID will help reduce frustration and keep the user to a minimum number of multiple usernames and passwords which they may find difficult to remember. Since password recovery process is tedious the user will be more inclined to use the site that makes it easiest for them to use. However using the same password at each of your favorite websites poses a security risk. With OpenID, you can use a single, existing account (from providers like Google, Yahoo, AOL or your own blog) to sign in to thousands of websites without ever needing to create another username and password. This makes OpenID is the safer and easier method to joining new sites.

OpenID is a decentralized standard, meaning it is not controlled by any one website or service provider. You control how much personal information you choose to share with websites that accept OpenID. Multiple OpenIDs can be used for different websites or purposes. If your email (Google, Yahoo, AOL), photo stream (Flickr) or blog (Blogger, WordPress, LiveJournal) serves as your primary online presence, OpenID allows you to have a portable identity across the web.

Many web users deploy the same password across multiple websites. And since traditional passwords are not centrally administered, if a security compromise occurs at any website you use, a hacker could gain access to your password across multiple sites. OpenID is more secure because passwords are never shared with any websites, and if a compromise does occur, you can simply change the password for your OpenID, thus immediately preventing a hacker from gaining access to your accounts at any websites you visit.

Use of APIs to share content

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Api

The practice of publishing APIs has allowed web communities to create an open architecture for sharing content and data between communities and applications. In this way, content that is created in one place can be dynamically posted and updated in multiple locations on the web.

  1. Photos can be shared from sites like Flickr and Photobucket to social network sites like Facebook and MySpace.
  2. Content can be embedded, e.g. embedding a presentation from SlideShare on a LinkedIn profile.
  3. Content can be dynamically posted. Sharing live comments made on Twitter with a Facebook account, for example, is enabled by their APIs

If you have any questions or comments about APIs or OpenID,  please tweet them to me @trevortye on Twitter or email me here