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Updating WordPress to the Latest Version

There’s a WordPress update (version 3.4) available called “Green” to honor guitarist Grant Green.

Maintenance and Tools

For many, it’s a fear-filled process that they’d rather ignore. But ignoring updates to your WordPress site can make things a lot worse in the long run. It’s worth the time and effort to just go ahead and upgrade.

There are a couple of steps you can take to make the process less fear-full:

  1. Be sure to back up your site (preferably in your hosting account) before you update.  Contact your hosting company and ask them to show you how to do a manual backup of your account. Most good hosting companies are happy to train you to manage your hosting account and perform maintenance (like backing up your sites)
    Note: this can take some time depending on the size of your sites.
  2. For extra protection from “bad things” happening, deactivate your plugins so there is less chance of conflicts while you are upgrading.  Once the upgrade is complete, activate your plugins one by one and watch for any messages from WordPress that says there is a fatal error or conflict with the new version of WordPress and your plugins. If you find there is a conflict with a plugin, you will have to remove it (or at the very least, leave it de-activated to see if the developer upgrades her plugin (to reflect the WordPress changes) in the next few days.

If you need help with you WordPress upgrades, I am happy to help and have Support Packages available to assist you with maintenance of your site(s).

Here’s a link to learn more about the update:  http://wordpress.org/news/2012/06/green/

WordPress 3.3

The newest, and long awaited version of WordPress has been rolled out.

WordPress 3.3, also known as “Sonny”, has been named to honor of the great jazz saxophonist, Sonny Stitt (all major releases are named in honor of a famous Jazz musician) .

WordPress 3.3 offers added simplicity to the dashboard area in terms of tips, navigation and uploading media. This will be an especially welcome change for the new user and their experience in getting to know WordPress.

To quote the people from WordPress:

For Users

Experienced users will appreciate the new drag-and-drop uploader, hover menus for the navigation, the new toolbar, improved co-editing support, and the new Tumblr importer. We’ve also been thinking a ton about what the WordPress experience is like for people completely new to the software. Version 3.3 has significant improvements there with pointer tips for new features included in each update, a friendly welcome message for first-time users, and revamped help tabs throughout the interface. Finally we’ve improved the dashboard experience on the iPad and other tablets with better touch support.

For Developers

There is a ton of candy for developers as well. I’d recommend starting your exploration with the new editor API, new jQuery version, better ways to hook into the help screens, more performant post-slug-only permalinks, and of course the entire list of improvements on the Codex and in Trac.

They’ve also created this quick video that gives a really good overview of the changes.

Need help updating your site to the new version?

Contact me via the form below. It goes directly to my personal email address.

PS:  Tomorrow, December 15th  is the last day to enter the draw to win a complete WordPress Website from The Savvy VA. Click here to find out more: thesavvyva.com/wordpress-website-giveaway/

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What is a WordPress Theme?

Someone has been thinking logically. It’s the best description of WordPress that I’ve seen in a while:

A WordPress theme is a collection of PHP and CSS files that change the appearance of your site without changing the content, which is stored in a database. This allows you to easily change the presentation of your website by switching themes, while the content remains.

To use a metaphor, the Theme system provides a “skin” your website while WordPress is providing the “bones” of the site in its underlying code.

Read the rest of the article here:

http://www.hyperarts.com/blog/intro-wordpress-theme-frameworks-child-themes/

 

 

WordPress Tip: Embedding code into a post or page

Strategies For Better Blog Posts

What makes a blog post interesting?

  • What features does it have that make people read it?
  • What sets it apart from all the others?

With your target market or client base always in mind, you can do any of the following to make your blog postings stand out. As an added benefit, most of these strategies are SEO or Search Engine Optimization and make your postings more ‘magnetic’ to the Search Engines.

Bolding

  • Adding Bullets

√ Making checklists

Using Italics

Adding Interesting Images & Captions

~ BLINK some BLUE ~

Using Short Paragraphs.

Having Titles

& Sub Titles

Underlining : Pros and cons to this. Some people believe that only links should be underlined. I tend to agree, but you could try it anyway.

Indenting

Crossing Out

Color

Handwriting

To get some really great tips on SEO ing your posts and pages, sign up in the

box below to receive my free 6 part

Simple SEO for WordPress (for non-techies)

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WordPress Widgets

prayer-machine-ii

Widget

What are WordPress Widgets?

Here is how WordPress.org defines widgets:

A WordPress Widget is a tool built into WordPress that is designed to provide a simple way to arrange the various elements of your sidebar content (known as “widgets”) without having to change any code.

So what does that mean exactly? Well WordPress templates have at least one sidebar (or should) and are designed so that you can easily put your very important information into that sidebar.

Some elements that come to mind are your opt-in box, links to your social media sites, affiliate links, your Facebook Fanpage widget, your Ezinearticles.com widget, and subscription links like RSS.

Some widgets come already installed with your template and others need to be added if required/wanted.

What I like about the sidebar generally is that it gives more space “above the fold” (above the fold being everything that a viewer can see before they have to scroll).  You have very little time to make an impression so you want your viewer to see as much as possible rather quickly.  Hence, you usually see opt in boxes in the top right of the sidebar.

For more information about widgets, click here to see my short YouTube video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ByIBZZuWe_k

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